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7 Things to Learn from Your Organisation’s Guerrilla Enterprise Network

Many organisations without officially endorsed enterprise social networks are discovering informal networks being tried under the radar. In most cases it’s groups of empowered and engaged individuals taking their desire to share and collaborate online.

Amazingly, some heads-of see this as problematic.

Really? Can it really be a bad thing when groups of employees are trying to have conversations and build new things? Surely opportunity is a better word.

Still not convinced? Well, here’s our top 7 things you can learn from a below-the-radar enterprise social network.

  1. What conversations are bubbling up waiting to happen and who’s having them.
  2. Who your champions should be when you take the leap to embedding an enterprise-wide social network.
  3. How the particular tool works and what users do and don’t like about it – great insight for specifying the right tool for your organisation.
  4. How users benefit from the tool.
  5. How people use the tool and how it fits with working practices.
  6. How the organisation can benefit – eg reduced email, greater transparency on projects etc.
  7. How mature the culture of collaboration is within the organisation and what might need to be done to make your organisation more joined up.
Plus some insights I’ll bet you’ll discover – no doubt contrary to many expectations.
  1. People are responsible and don’t waste their time posting pictures of cats, abuse colleagues or share inappropriate content.
  2. ESNs aren’t about IT (in this case IT probably didn’t even know it existed). They’re about people.
  3. People don’t need lots of training and heavy guidelines to get on board and get something from an enterprise social network.
This post was filed under Collaboration, Digital transformation, Internal comms, Working culture. Join the conversation - leave a comment.

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